Validate The Need for Care Before & After
Diagnostics
Written by TAC Staff   
Friday, 22 April 2005 14:51 Read : 635 times

"Being a Chiropractor is a tough job nowadays. Not only do you have to be excellent at what you do, you also have to be ready to defend yourself and your profession from many persons in the medical community and insurance industry that are constantly trying to eliminate or suppress the honorable profession of chiropractic..."

—Brian Roettger, D.C.

For our special feature in this issue focusing on Diagnostics, Electromedicine and X-rays, we asked several companies specializing in technology that “proves the need for care” to demonstrate how their products can effectively help you do just that!

Insight Subluxation UnitInsight Subluxation Station
by Chiropractic Leadership Alliance (CLA)

 

AmberThe Story of Amber

Little Amber, age 6, had a 4-year history of asthma, was taking thirteen different medications daily, had two sets of ear tubes, with three solid weeks of continuous coughing and too numerous antibiotics to count.  After six weeks, Amber’s parents were elated about the results, even though they were nervous about taking her off the drugs completely.

insight.gifFast forward five months: Amber is medication free with not one asthma attack.  She runs, plays and enjoys sports.  Her teachers are always concerned about her breathing, but Amber’s reply is, “I’m fine, really.”  And her Insight scan confirms that! Amber received care 3 times per week in the beginning. As the scans improved, so did her demeanor and positive outlook.  She is a regular visitor to her chiropractor for wellness care.

The Story of Debbie

Debbie was told by medical doctors that she had 6 months to live.
Today she lives a happy and healthy life….and her Insight scan continues to show improvement.

For more information, contact Chiropractic Leadership Alliance at 888-887-7113 or visit www.subluxation.com.

 

 

DXAnalyzer©
by International Diagnostic Technologies (IDT)

Jackson's AngleThis patient was rear ended at approximately 8 mph with minimal automotive damages.  He suffers from headaches, blurred vision, dizziness, neck and shoulder pain, and tingling down both arms and hands.

This patient’s spinal trauma resulted in loss of cervical curve demonstrated by Ruth Jackson’s Angle at 2.32 degrees, interruption of George’s Line throughout the cervical spine, and cervical spondylolisthesis Grade I at C3 and C4.

Cervical SpondylolisthesisThis software technology also demonstrated that this patient’s digital analysis revealed “Loss of Motion Integrity” at C4=5.13 mm posterior, yielding an impairment based on X-ray forensics at 25% whole person (AMA Guides, Fifth Edition).

For more information, contact Donn Bauer at International Diagnostic Technologies, 888-926-2774; email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , or visit www.dxanalyzer.com.

PulStarFRASTM
by Sense Technology, Inc.

The PulStar bar graphs represent the relative stiffness of locations along the spine. The graph on the right represents the stiffness prior to treatment (pre-analysis). The bar graph on the left represents stiffness after treatment. The pre-analysis is used along with patient history, complaint and other analyses—such as X-ray, CT (computed tomgraphy) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)—to formulate a diagnosis of joint dysfunction which leads to the site chosen for treatment. The post-analysis is used to confirm that the expected result of the treatment has been achieved.

Pre-analysis / post-analysis

For more information, contact Sense Technology, Inc.; 4241 William Penn Hwy., 1st Floor; Murrysville, PA 15668.  Call 800-628-9416; email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

The Tytron C-3000
by Titronics

A 35-year-old female presented for chiropractic care one week after being involved in a motor vehicle accident. Her symptoms included neck, mid back, and low back pain, along with a history of chronic asthma. The pre-treatment image shows multiple areas of spinal neuropathophysiology. Combined with other physical evidence, this image demonstrated the need for chiropractic care in this case.

Pre/post treatment images

Tytron C-300 UnitThe post-treatment image shows resolution of the patient’s presenting spinal condition. At this time, her spinal complaints had resolved along with all evidence of the asthmatic condition.

For more information, contact Titronics Research and Development, 800-705-2307/319-683-2702, or visit www.titronics.com.

MyoVision 8000 SEMG
by MyoVision

MyoVision 8000 sEMG UnitTesting performed with MyoVision 8000 SEMG:  Shown with Static, Dynamic Thermography and Dual Inclinometers.

The patient was injured in a bar fight.  In the fight the patient was hit over the head with a heavy object and presented with soft tissue injuries. Symptoms included headaches and neck pain with tingling down the right arm. The patient displayed a decrease in cervical range of motion in all planes, positive foramina compression test on the right, and an increase in sensitivity of the C-6 dermatome on the right. The patient was treated over the following four months with a treatment plan of 3x a week for 6 weeks, then 2x a week for 6 weeks, followed by 1x a week for 4 weeks. The adjustments were delivered using an instrument-adjusting device by Dr. Larry Miggins of Bainbridge Island, Washington.

Static Test

Static Testing Interpretation:

In this case, the static test shows very high levels of muscle tension in the cervical spine.  There is bilateral bracing as the patient is most likely experiencing pain or joint restriction due to the injury.  Also, muscle tension of the lumber spine on the left is very low, indicating a possible secondary effect of the injury.  Areas where muscle tension is low may be indicative of long-term muscle spasm, as the muscles tend to “shut down, and bulk” in response to constant firing.  This phenomenon, where muscles appear tense to the touch, but are low (yellow readings) is known as “contracture”.  

Dynamic TestDynamic Testing Explanation:

With Dynamic SEMG, electrodes are attached to the skin, and muscle activity is measured as the patient moves.  As an analogy, the Static SEMG is “static” like an X-ray, and Dynamic SEMG is like video fluoroscopy.

Dynamic Test Interpretation:

The top half of the graph is the left (blue) and right (red) cervical paraspinals, with the bottom half of the graph the left (blue) and right (red) SCM’s. The patient is performing two rotations beginning with a left rotation.  Marker 1 is maximum left rotation.  Marker 2 is the patient stopped at neutral.  Marker 3 is maximum right rotation. Marker 4 is neutral.  Marker 5, 6, 7, and 8 repeat the same motions as in marker’s 1, 2, 3, and 4.

For more information, contact David Marcarian at 800-969-6961, or via email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Radiographic Biomechanical Reports
by Spinal Logic Diagnostics, Inc.

This report is based upon biomechanical analysis and protocols that have been established for roentgenological computerized digitization printouts of the spine.  This evaluation does not include or constitute a pathological report.  Radiographs used were of acceptable quality and in compliance with normal protocols for X-ray digitization.

Patient’s Name: Jane Q. Public
BEFORE
Date of Films: 2/24/04
Report: 2/26/04

Before

Lateral Cervical Spine: FINDINGS:
Occiput Angle = 20.6° (normal = 16.1°).
George’s appears to be relatively continuous and without interruption in the neutral lateral view.
Jackson’s Angle = 7.7°  (normal = 39.9°).
Atlas/Skull Angle = 9.4°  (normal = 5.6°).
Vertebral baselines are abnormally divergent.
Atlas Angle = 11.1° (normal = 21.7°).
Atlas/Axis Angle = 24.6°  (normal = 0.2°).
Motion Segment Integrity, Angular variation is abnormal at    C2 = 10.8°, C3 = 11.3°, C5 = 12.8° and C6 = 9.8° (normal<7.0°).
Motion Segment Integrity, Translation is abnormal at C3 = 2.2mm, C4 = 4.4mm, C5 = 2.4mm and C6 = 1.7mm. (normal<1mm).

Lateral Cervical Spine: IMPRESSION:

1. The decreased Jackson’s Angle corroborates substantial hypolordosis of the cervical spine.

2. Compensation for the abnormal Jackson’s Angle appears to have taken place in the upper cervical spine as evidenced by the significant variances from normal in the Atlas Angle and the Atlas/Axis Angle.

3. Abnormal motion segment integrity values are indicated for both angular variation and translation as listed above.  These findings are highly suggestive of ligament and connective tissue damage. *

4. Ratable motion segment integrity loss is measured at C3 and C5 for angular variation values in excess of 11° and at C4 for translation values greater than or equal to 3.5mm.  By definition these findings confirm damage resulting in spinal segmental instability. **

AFTER
Date of Films: 7/28/04
Report: 7/29/04

After

Lateral Cervical Spine: FINDINGS:
Occiput Angle = 20.9° (normal = 16.1°).
George’s appears to be relatively continuous and without interruption in the neutral lateral view.
Jackson’s Angle = 20.1°  (normal = 39.9°).
Atlas/Skull Angle = 1.8°  (normal = 5.6°).
Vertebral baselines are abnormally divergent.
Atlas Angle = 19.1° (normal = 21.7°).
Atlas/Axis Angle = 25.6°  (normal = 0.2°).
Motion Segment Integrity, Angular variation is abnormal at C2= 9.0°, C3= 11.1°, C5= 10.8° and C6= 7.0° (normal<7.0°).
Motion Segment Integrity, Translation is abnormal at C3 = 2.3mm, C4 = 2.9mm, C5 = 1.9mm and C6 = 1.4mm. (normal<1mm).

Lateral Cervical Spine: IMPRESSION:

1. The decreased Jackson’s Angle corroborates substantial hypolordosis of the cervical spine.

2. Compensation for the abnormal Jackson’s Angle appears to have taken place in the upper cervical spine as evidenced by the significant variances from normal in the Atlas/Axis Angle.

3. Abnormal motion segment integrity values are indicated for both angular variation and translation as listed above.  These findings are highly suggestive of ligament and connective tissue damage. *

4. Ratable motion segment integrity loss is measured at C3 for an angular variation value in excess of 11°.  By definition this finding confirms damage resulting in spinal segmental instability. **

Recommendation:  Correlate the structural findings with functional examination findings, i.e., spinal range of motion, computerized muscle testing, nerve conduction velocity (NCV) testing, etc., to determine levels of vertebral subluxation and formulate a treatment plan.

For more information, contact Spinal-Logic Diagnostics, Inc.; 11417 124th Ave NE, Ste.102; Kirkland, WA  98033. Phone 800-768-7253 Ext 2 or visit www.spinallogic.com.


 
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